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20121205
20121213
STATION
MSNBCW 8
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MSNBC 4
WHUT (Howard University Television) 2
CSPAN2 1
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
've had those things happen, do they have a productive environment to solve problems? not necessarily. they're still overcoming the divisiveness, the hard feelings from all of that." at the time reporters wanted to know whether rick snyder would support what is known as a right to work law. the idea of right to work is simple. under a right to work law, employees of a union shop don't have to pay union dues. the employees get the benefit of the union, the higher wages and better health care, all of that, but they do not have to pay for it. why pay money if you can have something for free? for unions, the results of this are close to catastrophic which is why republicans and big business love right to work laws. they are a way of destroying unions. the same heritage foundation that will be jim demint's new home says union membership fell by 15% in states that passed right to work. union organizing fell by half, passing a right to work law stops unions and it stops organizing. on the labor left, the economic policy institute reports that wages fall by more than 3% after you institute ri
and cared about the environment. those things are important to me. when the party start eed moving away from those thing and taking away the sunday before election to vote. there's a great tradition after church to go and vote in states that have early voting. it just seemed to me there was real suppression going on, it wasn't a tolerant party, it wasn't doing what was right for the environment or public education. i'm a public school kid. my dad was on the school board when i was a kid. i have three sisters, two have been public school teachers here in florida. i have a heart for that kind of thing, and it means an awful lot to me. people have told me for a long time, chris, charlie, you have really been a democrat, you just didn't know it. i mean, these are people that i went to college with and went to law school with. >> are you going to lead the charge -- >> so i'm bloglad to be here. >> are you going to lead the charge around the country for people who were republicans to become democrats. >> i think they should if we were like me. sort of middle of the road and common sense republican
environment to solve problems? not necessarily. they're still overcoming the divisiveness, the hard feelings from all of that. that last quote of course was from rick snyder. current governor of michigan, who is apparently now been convinced that nothing is too divisive for his state. what happened to governor rick snyder around so fast on this? and what is going to happen to michigan if they pushed this through, as they say they are going to at lightning speed as early as tomorrow morning with no debate? joining us now for some insight is andy potter. he is a state vice president in the michigan corrections labor union. mr. potter himself is a republican, which makes me particularly grate to feel have a chance to talk to you tonight. so thank you for being here. >> absolutely. >> you are republican. your republican party is poised to strip union rights in a way that they didn't campaign on and that nobody really saw coming. why do you support union rights and what do you think is going on with your party? >> well, i support union rights because i've seen throughout the years the good that t
on them or to hear people talking about them, let me do it into an environment and can go paddling kind of go paddling around in there, so defined, i kind of like honey boo boo and on watching it, i still think that's a huge part of the american television experience. and i think it gets sold short we get the techno- ecstatic dogma anytime, anywhere, now. i do still think a lot of american love the enjoyment of escape and be able to kind of roam around the tv channel finding things they didn't know were there. >> michael powell on the future of television, tonight eight eastern on "the communicators," on c-span2. >> we are live this morning at the woodrow wilson center here in washington where immigrationworks u.s.a. is hosting a forum on the impact of the latino vote 2012 presidential race. panelists will analyze the outcome of november's election and whether it will impact immigration policy. among the speakers today, a member of president obama's presidential campaign, dan restrepo, and "washington times" political editor, stephen finan. this is live coverage on c-span2. >> [inaudibl
reduction or medicare and medicaid and social security or the environment, global climate change, it all comes back to how we receive information. and that this issue you're addressing in this letter is at the heart of your -- >> bill, many of the viewers there are concerned about the growing gap, unequal distribution of wealth and income. they're concerned about health care, concerned about global warming, concerned about women's rights, health, and many, many other issues. if you are concerned about those issues, you must be concerned about media and the increased concentration of ownership in the media. because unless we get ordinary people involved in that discussion. unless we make media relevant to the lives of ordinary people and not use it as a distraction, we are not going to resolve many of these serious crisis, global warming being one. there are scientists who will come on your show and say, "hey, forget everything else. if we don't get a handle on global warming, there's not going to be much less of this planet in a hundred years." do you see that often being portrayed in th
our schools, dealing with the environment, our perspective is absolutely essential. so you may have women in congress, a couple, but what really matters is to have women at the table so that our perspectives, our lifetime of experience can be reflected in the work we do. >> you've been at the table for a while but your influence is obviously increasing. tell me where you stand on fiscal cliff. what's going to happen here, congresswoman? >> well, i am hoping because i'm the kind of person that always worked across the aisle. in fact on my foreign-ones committee, kay granger and i have been called the odd couple, we work well together. i've spoken to hal rodgers, chairman of the appropriations committee, i'm optimist being that we can sit at the table and get these things done. comprehensive tax reform is going to take longer, but we can make sure that the middle class keeps its tax cuts. we can make sure we target some waste. you can have across-the-board cuts. we have to have a very clear plan to cut back on certain areas. we can't cut back on programs that benefit the working and t
make this whole environment safer for everyone. >> bill: you know what always gets me, if you -- politically it seems to me, this should not be a liberal republican, conservative or democratic issue. >> you're right. >> bill: but as a -- if you look as a conservative and your goal is to get rid of government programs, that cost a lot of money, waste a lot of money and accomplish nothing boy number one on the list would be the war on drugs wouldn't it? >> you want to get rid of $2.6 billion being spenter year. -- spent every year. this is one agency. remember, the d.e.a. was created for one purpose. richard nixon put them together for only one purpose. that is the war on drugs. so you know, i know that we need some of those employees from d.e.a. to manage the pharmaceutical industry. so you dissect that small portion. and you send them over to food and drug. and you get rid of the rest of the enforcement side of the d.e.a. there is a couple million -- billion right there. we can get rid of it tomorrow. >> bil
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)